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Dermatology

Welcome to the dermatology category which includes links to resources for physicians and pharmacists on clinical guidelines, dermatology images, medical journal articles, prescribing for skin diseases and more.

Potency of Topical Corticosteroids

Table showing the class and potency of topical corticosteroids in the UK.

Source: resourceclinical
Clinical Resource: Table

 

British Association of Dermatologists Clinical Guidelines

Source: bad.org.uk
Clinical Resource: Guidelines
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Last Checked: 15/05/15 Link Error: Report It

 

American Academy of Dermatology Clinical Guidelines

Source: aad.org
Clinical Resource: Guidelines
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

European Dermatology Forum Guidelines

Source: euroderm.org
Clinical Resource: Guidelines
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Last Checked: 20/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Guidance > Skin conditions

Source: nice.org.uk
Clinical Resource: Guidance
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Last Checked: 18/05/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Position Statements - Canadian Dermatology Association

Source: dermatology.ca
Clinical Resource: Position Statements
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

BestBETs
Skin

BETs were developed in the Emergency Department of Manchester Royal Infirmary, UK, to provide rapid evidence-based answers to real-life clinical questions, using a systematic approach to reviewing the literature. BETs take into account the shortcomings of much current evidence, allowing physicians to make the best of what there is.

Source: bestbets.org
Clinical Resource: Evidence Based Answers to Clinical Questions
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Skin - CLEAR: clinical enquiry and response service

The CLEAR service is delivered by a team of information professionals based at Healthcare Improvement Scotland and NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde.

CLEAR aims to provide clinicians with summarised evidence relating to aetiology, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment queries about patient care.

Source: knowledge.scot.nhs.uk
Clinical Resource: Evidence Based Answers to Clinical Questions
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

The Cochrane Collaboration
Cochrane Reviews - Skin

Cochrane is an international, non-profit, independent organisation, established to ensure that up-to-date, accurate information about the effects of healthcare interventions is readily available worldwide. It produces and disseminates systematic reviews of healthcare interventions, and promotes the search for evidence in the form of clinical trials and other studies of the effects of interventions.

Source: cochrane.org
Clinical Resource: Systematic Reviews
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Last Checked: 13/07/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Bandolier Knowledge
Skin

A short section on skin disorders and treatment.

Source: bandolier.org.uk
Clinical Resource: Evidence Based Abstracts
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Last Checked: 13/06/17 Link Error: Report It

 

Skin Therapy Letter

This website lets you access articles published in Skin Therapy Letter© as well as comprehensive treatment information on various skin conditions including acne, rosacea, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, eczema, skin cancer, as well as botox™, mild cleansers and lice.

Source: skintherapyletter.com
Clinical Resource: Various
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Skin Therapy Letter - Pharmacist Edition.

In 2006 we introduced Skin Therapy Letter© – Pharmacist Edition and launched this corresponding website, which offers which offers current, peer-reviewed, dermatology information to pharmacists across Canada.

This website also lets you access comprehensive patient information on various skin conditions written and peer-reviewed by dermatologists.

Source: skinpharmacies.ca
Clinical Resource: Various
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

DermNet NZ

DermNet NZ provides authoritative information about skin diseases, conditions and treatment for patients and their health professionals.

Source: dermnet.org.nz
Clinical Resource: Various
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

DermQuest

The DermQuest Editorial Board are a panel of highly respected international dermatologists with interests in patient practice and academic research. The remit of the Editorial Board is as follows: to set and approve the DermQuest editorial strategy; to set topics for articles and key opinion pieces written for the DermQuest site; to develop articles and key opinion pieces for the DermQuest site, or commission colleagues to do so; and to vet and approve all new content developed for the DermQuest site and all content submitted by users in an independent manner.

Source: dermquest.com
Clinical Resource: Various
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Disease Management Project Dermatology Chapters

The Disease Management Project is an online medical reference, designed to provide nationally established treatment guidelines for the most commonly seen diseases and conditions.

Disease Management Project Chapters

  • Acne and Rosacea
  • Atopic Dermatitis
  • Blistering Diseases
  • Bugs Bites and Stings
  • Common Benign Growths
  • Common Skin Infections
  • Contact Dermatitis and Related Conditions
  • Dermatologic Signs of Systemic Disease
  • Drug Eruptions
  • Hair Disorders
  • Melanoma
  • Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer
  • Pigmentary Disorders
  • Pruritus
  • Psoriasis
  • The Aging Skin
Source: clevelandclinicmeded.com
Clinical Resource: Medical Reference
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

The Electronic Textbook of Dermatology

This document is a resource of the Internet Dermatology Society

Table of Contents

  • Acne and Cysts
  • Anatomy
  • Alopecia
  • Biowarfare
  • Blistering Diseases
  • Botanical Dermatology
    • Contact Urticaria
    • Irritant Dermatitis (mechanical)
    • Irritant Dermatitis (chemical)
    • Phytophotodermatitis
    • Allergic Contact Dermatitis
    • Occupational plant dermatitis
  • Common Diseases
  • Contact Dermatitis
  • Warts (CHPV)
  • AAFP Derm Curriculum
  • Diabetes in Skin Disease
  • Drug reactions
  • Emergencies
  • Immunology
  • Laboratory Exams
  • Signs of Systemic Disease
  • Parasites
  • Radiation Effects
  • STDs (Herpes, etc.)
  • Sun Damage
  • Sunscreens
  • Terminology
  • Topical Therapeutics
Source: telemedicine.org
Clinical Resource: Electronic Textbook
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Primary Care Dermatology Society
A-Z of clinical guidance

The clinical guidance section is an educational tool, written in chapters very much like an up to date dermatology text book. Each chapter introduces the relevant skin condition, highlights key diagnostic features and provides advice on management.

The clinical chapters provide concise guidance about dermatological conditions and their management. Where there is diagnostic uncertainty refer to the diagnostic tables.

Source: pcds.org.uk
Clinical Resource: Clinical Guidance and Diagnostic Tables
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Specials Recommended by the British Association of Dermatologists for Skin Disease
On behalf of the BAD Specials Working Group 2014

Most prescribing uses licensed medicines whose safety and efficacy are assured. For many common dermatological diseases including psoriasis and eczema, the range of licensed medicines is limited. As a result, Dermatology prescribing may rely significantly on unlicensed creams and ointments (known as ‘Specials’) containing tars, dithranol, salicylic acid, steroids and other active constituents in a range of concentrations and bases. This is of particular concern in primary care where lack of effective price controls and a mechanism to ensure independent scrutiny of product quality has increased costs and concern about standards. To address these concerns and help to optimise quality of care, adherence to the revised British Association of Dermatologists (BAD) list of preferred Specials (2014) is encouraged.

Source: bad.org.uk
Clinical Resource: Publication
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Last Checked: 15/05/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Topical issues - emollients and corticosteroids

This release discusses the role of emollients and topical corticosteroids for the treatment of dry itchy skin in dermatitis (eczema). The therapeutic brief promotes the regular use of emollients, and using the least potent topical corticosteroid required to control the symptoms, for the shortest duration possible.

Source: veteransmates.net.au
Clinical Resource: Brief
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Emollients — advice for use
NHS Wirral

Source: mm.wirral.nhs.uk
Clinical Resource: Guideline
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Choosing Topical Corticosteroids

Topical corticosteroids are one of the oldest and most useful treatments for dermatologic conditions. There are many topical steroids available, and they differ in potency and formulation. Successful treatment depends on an accurate diagnosis and consideration of the steroid’s delivery vehicle, potency, frequency of application, duration of treatment, and side effects. Although use of topical steroids is common, evidence of effectiveness exists only for select conditions, such as psoriasis, vitiligo, eczema, atopic dermatitis, phimosis, acute radiation dermatitis, and lichen sclerosus. Evidence is limited for use in melasma, chronic idiopathic urticaria, and alopecia areata.

Source: aafp.org
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Topical Corticosteroids
A Quick Guide to Potency, Structural Class and Cross-Reactivity

In 2005, the American Contact Dermatitis Society designated corticosteroids as allergen of the year. In response, the following classification chart has been constructed with the objective to allow for quick referencing and cross-referencing of the members of the corticosteroid family.

Source: the-dermatologist.com
Clinical Resource: Table
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Last Checked: 28/11/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Relative Potency of Selected Topical Corticosteroids

Topical corticosteroids range in potency from mild (class VII) to superpotent (class I— Relative Potency of Selected Topical Corticosteroids). Intrinsic differences in potency are attributable to fluorination or chlorination (halogenation) of the compound.

Source: merckmanuals.com
Clinical Resource: Table
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Last Checked: 28/11/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Critical formulation aspects of local corticosteroids

Glucocorticoids play a major role in the treatment of various inflammatory skin disorders. Formulations individualised for patients’ unique skin and disease conditions offer many advantages, but may also raise certain problems.

Source: eahp.eu
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Topical Corticosteroids: Face Facts

The use of topical corticosteroids on the face can result in harmful skin effects such as atrophy, telangiectasia and periorificial dermatitis. These adverse reactions are greater with the more potent steroids but can be minimised by limiting use on the face. The risks of facial use should be communicated to patients, along with clear directions about where to apply the topical steroid and for how long to continue treatment.

Source: medsafe.govt.nz
Clinical Resource: Prescriber Update Article
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Dermatology Information System

DermIS.net is the largest dermatology information service available on the internet. It offers elaborate image atlases complete with diagnoses and differential diagnoses, case reports and additional information on almost all skin diseases

Source: dermis.net
Clinical Resource: Image Atlases
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Last Checked: 17/06/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Dermnet
Skin Disease Atlas

Dermnet is the largest independent photo dermatology source dedicated to online medical education though articles, photos and video. Dermnet provides information on a wide variety of skin conditions through innovative media.

Source: dermnet.com
Clinical Resource: Image Atlas
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Drug Interactions in Dermatology

This article aims to assist pharmacists in identifying patients at risk for clinically significant dermatologic drug interactions, review the general mechanisms of drug interactions, and help lower patients' risk with a discussion of select dermatologic drugs that may lead to adverse effects. With this knowledge, as well as proper screening, prescribing, and monitoring, clinicians can help prevent fatal consequences.

Source: uspharmacist.com
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Pharmacotherapy for Skin Disorders in Older People

Managing skin disorders in older people is often less than optimal because their special needs and limitations are not adequately addressed. This review provides an overview of treatments available for managing skin conditions commonly encountered in older people.

Source: shpa.org.au
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Practice Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Skin and Soft Tissue Infections: 2014 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America

Source: idsociety.org
Clinical Resource: Guideline
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Last Checked: 15/05/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Skin infections

A huge number of infections affect the skin either directly, as the primary site of infection, or indirectly, by virtue of causing an exanthem or other secondary eruption, such as erythema multiforme or vasculitis. Space does not permit significant discussion of such indirect associations so most of this review concentrates on direct skin infection and is highly selective. The emphasis is on disorders that are common but that may have significant health implications, and on some rarer but readily diagnosable disorders. Thus, the topics chosen for review are streptococcal cellulitis of the leg, staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome, herpes simplex and varicella zoster infections, and a potpourri of tropical skin infections that may present in returning travellers.

Source: rcpe.ac.uk
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Common skin infections in children

Most children will have a skin infection at some time. Skin infections are a common reason for consultation in primary care and in dermatology practice. We review four common skin infections in children and describe their epidemiology, clinical features, and treatment, focusing on treatments with best evidence.

Molluscum contagiosum
Viral warts
Impetigo
Tinea capitis (scalp ringworm)

More common skin infections in children

We now review four more skin infections commonly seen in children, describing the epidemiology, clinical features, and treatment of each. For conditions with limited evidence, we provide pragmatic advice and recommendations.

Scabies
Head lice (pediculosis capitis)
Folliculitis
Cold sores (herpes simplex virus)

Source: europepmc.org
Clinical Resource: Journal Articles
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Last Checked: 07/04/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Infestations

The resources which are available for this therapeutic topic can be accessed via the menu on the left-hand side of the page. The e-learning home page suggests ways in which you may like to use the wide variety of e-learning materials.

Source: webarchive.org.uk
Clinical Resource: e-Learning
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Last Checked: 24/04/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Mycology Online

Superficial Mycoses

These are superficial cosmetic fungal infections of the skin or hair shaft. No living tissue is invaded and there is no cellular response from the host. Essentially no pathological changes are elicited. These infections are often so innocuous that patients are often unaware of their condition.

The Cutaneous Mycoses

These are superficial fungal infections of the skin, hair or nails. No living tissue is invaded, however a variety of pathological changes occur in the host because of the presence of the infectious agent and its metabolic products.

The Subcutaneous Mycoses

These are chronic, localized infections of the skin and subcutaneous tissue following the traumatic implantation of the aetiologic agent. The causative fungi are all soil saprophytes of regional epidemiology whose ability to adapt to the tissue environment and elicit disease is extremely variable.

Source: mycology.adelaide.edu.au
Clinical Resource: Reference
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Fungal skin infections: current approaches to management

The dermatophyte skin infections tinea capitis, tinea pedis and onychomycosis are common and challenging to treat. Our Drug review focusses on key points and advances in their management, followed by further sources of information.

Source: eu.wiley.com
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Fungal skin and nail infections: diagnosis and laboratory investigation guide for primary care
Public Health England

Guidance for primary care on taking samples for diagnosing and treating fungal skin and nail infections; for consultation and adaptation

Source: gov.uk
Clinical Resource: Guidance
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Last Checked: 23/02/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Common scalp disorders in general practice

Scalp diseases are common in both children and adults. They can occur as primary scalp diseases, such as tinea capitis, traction alopecia, folliculitis keloidalis nuchae, and folliculitis decalvans, or as part of a generalised skin disease, like atopic dermatitis, seborrhoeic dermatitis, psoriasis, lichen planus, pityriasis rubra pilaris, and secondary syphilis. Scalp disorders can be non-scarring and reversible, while others can cause scarring, and are often permanent.

Source: sapj.co.za
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Recommended management of head lice and scabies

Patient education is vital in treating head lice and scabies to ensure successful eradication and to reduce the development of resistance. Our Drug review considers the available treatment options and some recent advances, followed by a review of the prescription data and sources of further information.

Source: eu.wiley.com
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Head Lice
Questions & Answers for Healthcare Professionals

This bulletin is laid out in a ‘question and answer’ format under three main headings: Disease background, diagnosis and treatment.

Source: wales.nhs.uk
Clinical Resource: Bulletin
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Last Checked: 08/04/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Head Lice Treatment in Breastfeeding Mothers

Headlice are a common problem for mothers wih older children. The breastfeeding mother may need to apply lotions to her children and may find herself affected too.

Source: breastfeedingnetwork.org.uk
Clinical Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 08/08/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Do Spinosad or Ivermectin Have a Place in Head Lice Eradication?

Increased incidence of resistance with evidence that common therapies are losing their effectiveness has lead to the production of new products. This article will discuss two new treatments for head lice to determine their place in therapy.

Source: oregonstate.edu
Clinical Resource: Newsletter
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Last Checked: 19/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

 

International Union against Sexually Transmitted Infections (IUSTI)
European Guideline for the Management of Scabies

Source: iusti.org
Clinical Resource: Guideline
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Scabies: diagnosis and treatment

Despite being readily treatable, scabies remains common. This is because it can be difficult both to diagnose and to ensure adequate treatment of patients and their contacts. This article seeks to clarify the diagnostic problems and help optimise treatment

Source: europepmc.org
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 07/04/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Scabies - diagnosis and management

Key concepts

  • Scabies transmission occurs when there is transfer of a fertilised female mite by direct, (approximately five minutes) skin-to-skin contact with an infected person.
  • Diagnosis is usually made clinically. Laboratory diagnosis is not usually necessary but may be useful for uncertain cases or cases in residential care.
  • Malathion and permethrin are effective treatments for scabies.
  • All recent contacts should be treated.
  • The itch may persist for weeks even though the mite is gone. However itch beyond six weeks may indicate treatment failure.
Source: bpac.org.nz
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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What drug should be used for treating scabies in a pregnant woman?

Scabies is a parasitic skin infestation caused by the human mite Sarcoptes scabiei var hominis.

Source: dpic.org
Clinical Resource: Drug and Poison Information Centre Newsletter
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Last Checked: 19/10/15 Link Error: Report It

 

British Association for Sexual Health and HIV Clinical Effectiveness Group UK National Guideline on the Management of Phthirus pubis Infestation

Source: bashh.org
Clinical Resource: Guideline
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Last Checked: 21/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

International Union against Sexually Transmitted Infections (IUSTI)
European Guideline for the Management of Pediculosis pubis

Source: iusti.org
Clinical Resource: Guideline
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Recommendations for the Management of Herpes Zoster

The objective of this supplement to Clinical Infectious Diseases is to improve the care of patients with HZ by providing practical, evidence-based recommendations that take into account clinical efficacy, adverse effects, impact on quality of life, and costs of treatment. Pharmacologic management is emphasized, because few nonpharmacologic approaches have been evaluated in randomized controlled trials. These recommendations apply only to the acute phase of HZ; detailed recommendations for the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), the most common complication of HZ, appear elsewhere. We describe the pathogenesis, epidemiological aspects, clinical aspects, and complications of HZ, and then we review the literature on the treatment of HZ and present specific treatment recommendations.

Source: cid.oxfordjournals.org
Clinical Resource: Supplement Article
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

The prevention and management of herpes zoster

Here, we provide an overview of the new vaccine and introduce clinicians to a new clinical paradigm — the prevention of HZ. We also apply current opinion and evidence to the management of HZ.

Source: mja.com.au
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

British Association for Sexual Health and HIV Clinical Effectiveness Group UK National Guideline on the Management of Anogenital Herpes

Source: bashh.org
Clinical Resource: Guideline
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Last Checked: 21/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

British Association for Sexual Health and HIV Clinical Effectiveness Group UK National Guideline on the Management of Anogenital Warts

Source: bashh.org
Clinical Resource: Guideline
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Last Checked: 05/10/15 Link Error: Report It

 

British Association for Sexual Health and HIV Clinical Effectiveness Group UK National Guideline on the Genital Management of Molluscum Contagiosum

Source: bashh.org
Clinical Resource: Guideline
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Last Checked: 21/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) Guideline > Management of Atopic Eczema in Primary Care

Source: sign.ac.uk
Clinical Resource: Guideline
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Last Checked: 18/05/15 Link Error: Report It

 

National Eczema Society
For Healthcare Professionals

An area dedicated to healthcare professionals with resources, research and advice

Source: eczema.org
Clinical Resource: Various
Register to Access Content: Yes - registration is FREE

Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

COMPASS Therapeutic Notes on the Primary Care Pharmacological Management of Atopic Eczema

In this issue

Introduction and background
Managing atopic eczema
Emollients
Topical corticosteroids
Topical calcineurin inhibitors
Systemic therapy of atopic eczema
Other treatments in atopic eczema
Infection and antimicrobials

Source: hscbusiness.hscni.net
Clinical Resource: Bulletin
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Last Checked: 22/11/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Skin Conditions - Eczema and Psoriasis

The resources which are available for this therapeutic topic can be accessed via the menu on the left-hand side of the page. The e-learning home page suggests ways in which you may like to use the wide variety of e-learning materials.

Source: webarchive.org.uk
Clinical Resource: e-Learning
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Last Checked: 24/04/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Eczematous reactions to food in atopic eczema: position paper of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and Global Allergy and Asthma European Network

Source: eaaci.org
Clinical Resource: Position Paper
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Last Checked: 28/04/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Contact dermatitis: A practice parameter - Update 2015

This parameter was developed by the Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters, which represents the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

Source: aaaai.org
Clinical Resource: Practice Parameter
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Last Checked: 08/05/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Atopic dermatitis: A practice parameter update 2012

This parameter was developed by the Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters, representing the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI); the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI); and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

Source: aaaai.org
Clinical Resource: Practice Parameter
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Last Checked: 08/05/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Management of Difficult-to-Treat Atopic Dermatitis

The aim of this review is to provide health care professionals with a holistic approach to the management of difficult-to-treat atopic dermatitis, defined as atopic dermatitis seemingly unresponsive to simple moisturizers and mild potency (classes VI and VII) topical corticosteroids. The critical importance of education and advice is emphasized, as is the seminal role of secondary bacterial infection and polyclonal T-cell activation in causing acute flares in patients with severe, generalized disease. In atypical cases or those that do not respond to treatment, alternative diagnoses should be considered.

Source: aaaai.org
Clinical Resource: Report
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Last Checked: 08/05/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Management of Psoriasis in Primary Care

This bulletin will focus on the contemporary management of psoriasis in primary care.

Source: stjames.ie
Clinical Resource: Medicines Information Centre Bulletin
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) Guideline > Diagnosis and Management of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis in Adults

Source: sign.ac.uk
Clinical Resource: Guideline
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Last Checked: 18/05/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Canadian Guidelines for the Management of Plaque Psoriasis
Canadian Psoriasis Guidelines Committee

Source: dermatology.ca
Clinical Resource: Guideline
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis Pocket Guide: Treatment Algorithms and Management Options

The third edition of the Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis Pocket Guide: Treatment Algorithms and Management Options, was authored by an expert panel of dermatologists and is aimed at helping physicians treat patients with specific types of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. The Pocket Guide, including its algorithms, was updated in the winter of 2009 to incorporate the use of biologic and other treatments that have become available since the second guide was issued in 2006.

Source: psoriasis.org
Clinical Resource: Pocket Guide
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

PsoriasisTx.com

PsoriasisTx.com is designed to provide educational resources for clinicians – dermatologists, dermatology nurses, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants, rheumatologists, and other health care providers – who manage patients with moderate to severe psoriasis or with psoriatic arthritis. Our goal is to offer our users easily accessible, up-to-date clinical information and to create a community of health care professionals that share clinical insights.

Source: psoriasistx.com
Clinical Resource: Various
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Psoriasis Image Library | International Psoriasis Council

The following images are made available as a courtesy for diagnosing and treating psoriasis. These are available for clinical and educational use only.

  • Localized Disease Images
  • Widespread Disease Images
  • Treatment Consequences Images
  • Other Disease Images
  • Psoriasis Mimics
Source: psoriasiscouncil.org
Clinical Resource: Images
Register to Access Content: Yes - registration is FREE

Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Fumaderm®: what is the evidence for its efficacy and safety in treating psoriasis?
Prepared by UK Medicines Information (UKMi) pharmacists for NHS healthcare professionals

This Medicines Q&A reviews the evidence for the efficacy and safety of Fumaderm® in treating psoriasis.

Source: sps.nhs.uk
Clinical Resource: Medicines Question and Answer
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Last Checked: 22/09/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Managing acne in primary care

Acne is a common dermatological condition that affects most people at some stage in their life. Because acne is regarded as “normal” and over-the-counter products are readily available, most people will not seek treatment from their General Practitioner. However, for some, acne will become significant enough to require medical management. Pharmacological treatment for acne is based on the severity of the symptoms and the impact of the condition on the patient. Treatment ranges from topical medicines for mild acne to oral isotretinoin for severe acne.

Source: bpac.org.nz
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

COMPASS Therapeutic Notes on the Management of Acne in Primary Care

In this issue:

Introduction, features & complications
Topical treatments of acne
Oral treatments of acne

Source: hscbusiness.hscni.net
Clinical Resource: Bulletin
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Last Checked: 22/11/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Evidence-Based Recommendations for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pediatric Acne
American Acne and Rosacea Society

The AARS Pediatric Acne Treatment Guidelines have been endorsed by the APP! The guidelines will be published in the May 2013 supplement to Pediatrics.

Source: acneandrosacea.org
Clinical Resource: Guideline
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Audiopearls | American Acne & Rosacea Society

As part of our educational initiative program, the AARS has developed Clinical and Research Audiopearls.

These audiopearls are recordings of conducted interviews between a member of the AARS Board or Executive Committee and a member of the Society regarding a hot topic in acne and rosacea science or treatment.

Oral Contraceptive Use in the Treatment of Acne
Updates in the Management of Rosacea
Novelties in Acne Pathogenesis
Childhood Acne
P. Acnes Decreased Sensitivity to Antibiotics

Source: acneandrosacea.org
Clinical Resource: Clinical Audio Pearls
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Last Checked: 20/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency
Product-specific information and advice > Isotretinoin for severe acne

Featured publications:

Physician's guide to prescribing isotretinoin
Checklist for prescribing isotretinoin to female patients
Pharmacist's guide to dispensing isotretinoin
Patient information brochure for isotretinoin
Brochure on contraception with isotretinoin

Source: webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk
Clinical Resource: Safety Information and Advice
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SafeRx
Isotretinoin - Safe Prescribing - Hit the Spot!

Isotretinoin is a high-risk medicine because it is a potent human teratogen and can cause severe foetal malformations. Foetal damage may occur if taken during pregnancy, including:

• effects on the central nervous system (hydrocephalus, microcephalus)
• cardiovascular abnormalities
• facial dysmorphia
• absence/deformity of ears
• thymus and parathyroid gland abnormalities
• eye defects (microphthalmia)

Source: saferx.co.nz
Clinical Resource: Bulletin
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Oral isotretinoin

Isotretinoin, a retinoid related to vitamin A, is an effective oral treatment for patients with severe cystic acne. Isotretinoin reduces sebum production, unblocks pores and stops formation of new comedones. By opening up the hair follicle, it also reduces the anaerobic bacteria that contribute to the inflammation seen in acne.

Source: nps.org.au
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Acne: a guide to prescribing isotretinoin

After completing this module you should know:

  • Which patients are appropriate candidates for isotretinoin therapy
  • How to prescribe isotretinoin
  • Important issues to cover when counselling a patient who is considering isotretinoin therapy
  • How to avoid and/or manage adverse effects of isotretinoin.
Source: learning.bmj.com
Clinical Resource: CPD / CME / Learning
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Acneiform Eruptions

Acneiform eruptions are dermatoses that resemble acne vulgaris. Lesions may be papulopustular, nodular, or cystic. While acne vulgaris typically consists of comedones, acneiform eruptions (such as acneiform drug eruptions) usually lack comedones clinically.

Source: medscape.com
Clinical Resource: Article
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Rosacea Medical Management Guidelines
American Acne and Rosacea Society

Source: acneandrosacea.org
Clinical Resource: Guideline
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Rosacea: A Review

After reviewing this article, readers should be able to:

  • Identify the common clinical presentations of rosacea.
  • Review appropriate treatment options for rosacea, including topical, systemic, and other therapies.
  • Differentiate between newer treatments for rosacea, both FDA-approved and non–FDA-approved.
  • Determine the most appropriate treatment strategies for patients with rosacea.
Source: europepmc.org
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Treatment options in the management of rosacea

Rosacea can be triggered by many factors, and lifestyle advice, trigger avoidance and skin care should underpin drug treatment. Here, the author discusses the clinical subtypes of rosacea and the treatment options.

Source: eu.wiley.com
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology guideline for the management of chronic urticaria and angioedema

Source: bsaci.org
Clinical Resource: Guideline
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Last Checked: 08/05/15 Link Error: Report It

 

The diagnosis and management of acute and chronic urticaria: 2014 update

These parameters were developed by the Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters (JTFPP), representing the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI); the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI); and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

Source: aaaai.org
Clinical Resource: Practice Parameters
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EAACI/GA2LEN/EDF/WAO guideline: management of urticaria

EAACI/GA2LEN/EDF/WAO guideline: definition, classification and diagnosis of urticaria

Source: eaaci.org
Clinical Resource: Guidelines
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European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology taskforce position paper: evidence for autoimmune urticaria and proposal for defining diagnostic criteria

Source: eaaci.org
Clinical Resource: Postion Paper
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Chronic Urticaria: Soothing the Itch

Urticaria and angioedema affects 15% to 25% of the population at some point in their lives. There are various causes for urticaria and angioedema. Urticarial vasculitis and urticaria pigmentosa are rare conditions but should be differentiated from urticaria. Diagnosis of these conditions is made by a biopsy.

Source: stacommunications.com
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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British Association for Sexual Health and HIV Clinical Effectiveness Group UK National Guideline on the Management of Vulval Conditions

Source: bashh.org
Clinical Resource: Guideline
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Common vulval dermatoses

Dermatoses that affect the vulva are the same as those that affect the rest of the skin, but the appearance is modified by the environment which produces heat, friction and occlusion. Vulval disorders present as infections, rashes, lesions and pigmentation, and pain. This article considers inflammatory vulval dermatoses that present as rashes that are erythematous, pale or erosive.

Source: racgp.org.au
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Primary-care Diagnosis and Treatment of Common Dermatological Problems in HIV Medicine

At the completion of this educational session, participants should be able to:

  • Recognize the dermatological signs of acute HIV.
  • Be more familiar with common dermatological presentations in chronic and advanced HIV disease.
  • Understand primary-care diagnosis and treatment approaches to common HIV-related dermatological problems, and when to refer to a specialist.
Source: prn.org
Clinical Resource: Video
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Hair and nails

The hair and nails are often neglected in our dermatological assessments, as the sheer number and breadth of conditions affecting the skin can seem overwhelming. This article focuses on common and important presentations to general practice, including general and specific conditions affecting both hair and nails.

Source: racgp.org.au
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Diagnosing and Treating Hair Loss

Hair loss is a common problem that affects up to 50 percent of men and women throughout their lives. It can occur anywhere on the body, but more commonly affects just the scalp when the patient presents with concerns about the cosmetic effect

Source: aafp.org
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Alopecia

Alopecia is loss of hair. It comes in a variety of patterns with a variety of causes although often it is idiopathic.

Source: patient.co.uk
Clinical Resource: Article
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Finasteride for Hair Loss in Women

The purpose of DPIC’s Drug Information Service is to provide information to help pharmacists and other healthcare professionals provide safe and rational drug therapy. DPIC was recently asked to clarify the use of finasteride for hair loss in women.

Source: dpic.org
Clinical Resource: Health Professional Article
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Last Checked: 19/10/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Stinging insect hypersensitivity: A practice parameter update 2011

These parameters were developed by the Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters, representing the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI); the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI); and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

Source: aaaai.org
Clinical Resource: Practice Parameter
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Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) Guideline > Management of Primary Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Source: sign.ac.uk
Clinical Resource: Guideline
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International Dermoscopy Society

The IDS has been founded in 2003 by H. Peter Soyer, Rainer Hofmann-Wellenhof and Giuseppe Argenziano to promote clinical research in dermoscopy and to represent a clinically oriented international organization with a thrust towards helping and improving education in dermoscopy.

Source: dermoscopy-ids.org
Clinical Resource: Various
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Dermoscopy Atlas

The International Atlas of Dermoscopy and Dermatoscopy is an educational activity of The Skin Cancer College of Australia and New Zealand.

Source: dermoscopyatlas.com
Clinical Resource: Atlas
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Wound Care

The resources which are available for this therapeutic topic can be accessed via the menu on the left-hand side of the page. The e-learning home page suggests ways in which you may like to use the wide variety of e-learning materials.

Source: webarchive.org.uk
Clinical Resource: e-Learning
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Dressings datacards

The full list of all SMTL dressings datacards, alphabetically.

Source: dressings.org
Clinical Resource: Data Cards
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World Wide Wounds

The mission of World Wide Wounds is to be the premier online resource for peer-reviewed information on dressing materials providing practical guidance on all aspects of wound management to health professionals worldwide.

As an independent online journal, World Wide Wounds is dedicated to promoting excellent practice and better communication across the speciality. The information provided will vary in complexity and depth. Basic articles will be provided to meet the needs of inexperienced nurses or those in training. More detailed articles will be provided for those with experience in wound care, whilst articles at the cutting edge of scientific research will attract leaders of the field. The focus of the majority of articles will remain clinically based and be of direct practical relevance to those who manage wounds on a daily basis.

Source: worldwidewounds.com
Clinical Resource: Journal
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Wound dressings

This article describes wound dressings currently available in the UK.

Source: europepmc.org
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Wound Management: In Need of a Structured Approach and Better Evidence for the Treatments

The series of articles on wound management will, I am sure, provide readers of the journal with relevant advice and information on a range of aspects of wounds and wound healing in clinical practice.

The Biology of Wound Healing

Wound healing involves a highly orchestrated sequence of events which is triggered by tissue injury and ends in either partial or complete regeneration or more commonly by repair.

Cleansing and Disinfection of Acute and Chronic Wounds

Wounds are cleansed with water or sterile saline mainly to support debridement of devitalised tissue by mechanical means. Disinfection may help reduce the microbial load of colonised or infected wounds.

Silver Dressings and Maggots

To many, any connection between silver and maggots may not be immediately obvious. To healthcare professionals, however, particularly those working in the wound management field, there is a clear link between the two.

Source: eahp.eu
Clinical Resource: Journal Articles
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Topical Antibiotic Treatment - powders, wound dressings and ointments

The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the more commonly used topical antibiotic agents and their role in therapy.

Source: sapj.co.za
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Topical Insulin

Q: A prescriber has requested “Humalogue” insulin cream to enhance wound healing. Is this preparation available?

Source: dpic.org
Clinical Resource: Health Professional Article
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Hyperhidrosis – Management Pathway
NHS Mid Essex Clinical Commissioning Group

Source: midessexccg.nhs.uk
Clinical Resource: Pathway
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Acute Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions

Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) are a common form of adverse drug reaction, affecting upto 3% of hospital patients. Almost any drug can cause a CADR and the effects can range from mild to life-threatening. When investigating a possible CADR it is important to include in the history all current/recent drugs, topical, over the counter (OTC), alternative medicines, vaccines and contrast media.

Source: druginformation.co.nz
Clinical Resource: Drug Information Service Bulletin
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Cutaneous Drug Reactions

In this review, we assess the current knowledge of four categories of cutaneous drug reactions: immediate-type immune-mediated reactions, delayed-type immune-mediated reactions, photosensitivity reactions, and autoimmune syndromes. Moreover, we describe evidence that viral infection is an important predisposing factor for the development of cutaneous drug reactions upon drug administration. Finally, we review the current knowledge of the type and mechanisms of cutaneous drug reactions to several categories of drugs.

Source: pharmrev.aspetjournals.org
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Drug Eruptions

Drug eruptions can mimic a wide range of dermatoses. The morphologies are myriad and include morbilliform, urticarial, papulosquamous, pustular, and bullous. Medications can also cause pruritus and dysesthesia without an obvious eruption.

A drug-induced reaction should be considered in any patient who is taking medications and who suddenly develops a symmetric cutaneous eruption. Medications that are known for causing cutaneous reactions include antimicrobial agents, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), cytokines, chemotherapeutic agents, anticonvulsants, and psychotropic agents.

Source: medscape.com
Clinical Resource: Article
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Causes and management of drug-induced angioedema

This article considers the recommended management of angioedema and the drugs commonly implicated.

Source: eu.wiley.com
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Photosensitivity: Light, sun and pharmacy

Educational aims

  • To provide an overview of different types of drug-induced photosensitivity reactions
  • To provide an overview of treatment options and prevention strategies
  • To provide an practical help as regards the use of sunscreen
Source: mcppnet.org
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Drug-Induced Photosensitivity

Drug-induced photosensitivity refers to the development of cutaneous disease as a result of the combined effects of a chemical and light. Exposure to either the chemical or the light alone is not sufficient to induce the disease; however, when photoactivation of the chemical occurs, one or more cutaneous manifestations may arise. These include phototoxic and photoallergic reactions, a planus lichenoides reaction, pseudoporphyria, and subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. Photosensitivity reactions may result from systemic medications and topically applied compounds.

Source: medscape.com
Clinical Resource: Article
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Drug-induced photosensitivity reaction

Drug induced photosensitivity reactions are a relatively common side effect associated with many medications. These reactions occur via activation of a chemical by ultra-violet or visible light. Many commonly used drugs are implicated (both systemic and topical use), and include amiodarone, NSAIDs, phenothiazines, retinoids, quinolones, sulfonamides, tetracyclines, and thiazides.

Source: auspharmlist.net.au
Clinical Resource: Pharmacy E-Bulletin
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Q: What are the differences between chemically-induced phototoxic and photoallergic reactions

A: Phototoxicity and photoallergy are two classifications of a chemically-induced reaction more commonly referred to as photosensitivity. This dermatologic reaction results from exposure to the sun after administration of select drugs and is characterized by erythema, edema, vesicles, and the formation of papules.

Source: duq.edu
Clinical Resource: Pharmaceutical Information Centre Publication
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Latex allergy occupational aspects of management
NHS Plus and Royal College of Physicians

The guideline focuses on the occupational aspects of managing latex allergy. Its aim is to provide evidence-based guidance to occupational health professionals.

Source: rcplondon.ac.uk
Clinical Resource: Guideline
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American Latex Allergy Association

We have assembled a wealth of information on latex allergy—these are our favorite and most frequently requested items. Learn about products for home, medical, dental and school use; federal documents and regulations; expert answers to common questions; and much more.

Source: latexallergyresources.org
Clinical Resource: Various
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Latex Reactions: Allergic and Non-Allergic Hypersensitivity

Approximately 12% of harvested latex is treated either with 0.7% of ammonia alone (high ammoniated latex) or with 0.2% ammonia and thiuram (low ammoniated latex) and used in the production of "dipped" products such as condoms, balloons and gloves.

Source: worldallergy.org
Clinical Resource: Summary
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Latest Latex List

Directory of non-medical latex-free product alternatives

Source: lasg.org.uk
Clinical Resource: List
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Q: A patient has a history of latex allergy. Can she receive Miacalcin® Nasal Spray and Zofran® injection?

A: Natural latex is the milky sap that originates from the rubber tree, Hevea brasiliensis. It is subsequently vulcanized with heat and chemicals to increase its elasticity. This newly formed product is termed natural rubber or natural rubber latex.

Source: duq.edu
Clinical Resource: Pharmaceutical Information Centre Publication
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How to manage a common dermatologic complaint – pruritus

When evaluating a patient with pruritus, it is important to determine if the pruritus is localized or generalized – to ascertain if it is related to an underlying systemic disease – and if it is occurring in the setting of primary lesions or only secondary excoriations.

Source: albertadoctors.org
Clinical Resource: Newsletter
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Underlying systemic causes of itch

Hepatobiliary, renal, endocrine and lymphoproliferative diseases are some of the most common underlying systemic causes of itch.Treatment should be guided by the diagnosis, and may include topical ster oids, oral antihistamines, opioid antagonists and phototherapy. In this review we outline the steps to take when evaluating a patient with pruritus. In addition,we highlight some of the more common systemic causes of itch and discuss treatment options.

Source: rcpe.ac.uk
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Skin manifestations of systemic disease

This article aims to highlight common dermatologic presentations where further assessment is needed to exclude an underlying systemic disease, to discuss classic cutaneous features of specific systemic diseases, and to outline rare cutaneous paraneoplastic syndromes.

Source: racgp.org.au
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Dermatologic Manifestations of HIV Infection

This article summarizes a presentation on dermatologic manifestations of HIV disease by Toby A. Maurer, MD, at the 8th Annual Clinical Conference for Ryan White CARE Act clinicians in New Orleans in June 2005.

Source: iasusa.org
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Q: Why would antiviral agents be prescribed prior to dermabrasion?

A: In recent years, cosmetic facial resurfacing has gained in popularity. This procedure involves removal of layers of damaged or wrinkled skin resulting in improved appearance.

Source: duq.edu
Clinical Resource: Pharmaceutical Information Centre Publication
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Last Checked: 13/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

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