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Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Welcome to the complementary and alternative medicine category for physicians and pharmacists. This category includes links to resources on herbal medicines, vitamins, herb-drug interactions and supplements.

Drug Interactions Checker - For Drugs, Food & Alcohol
Drugs.com

The Drug Interaction Checker explains the mechanism of each drug interaction, the level of significance of the interaction (major, moderate or minor), and in certain cases, can provide the recommended course of action to manage the interaction. The Drug Interaction Checker will also display any interactions between your chosen drug(s) and food.

Source: drugs.com
Clinical Resource: Database
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Drug Interaction Checker
Medscape

  • Use the search field above to look up prescription or OTC drugs, and herbal supplements
  • Add a full drug regimen and view interactions
Source: medscape.com
Clinical Resource: Database
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Herbal-Drug Interactions

The purpose of this article is to provide an evidence-based discussion and information to educate patients about potential herbal-drug interactions.

Source: inetce.com
Clinical Resource: CE / CPD / Learning
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Herbal medicines: adverse effects and drug-herb interactions

Most clinicians are oblivious to their patients’ use of herbal medicine. All medicinal agents have potentially unexpected effects including toxicity and interactions, and herbs are no different. Drug-herb interactions are based on the same pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles as drug-drug interactions. Herbal medicines do not need to be avoided, the only fundamental issue is that they should be considered as medicine and the adverse effects and potential interactions considered. Thus pharmacists and doctors should be better informed to minimise patient harm.

Source: mcppnet.org
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Drug interactions with complementary medicines

Health professionals are expected to be familiar with common and clinically significant complementary medicine interactions or at least know where to look them up. Knowing the dynamic and kinetic interactions associated with commonly used complementary medicines helps to identify the risk of drug interactions. Although information on complementary medicine interactions is not readily provided by the manufacturers, evidence is available by way of case reports, independent research and web based resources, which have increased in recent years. Collectively, these data make interactions with complementary medicines largely predictable and therefore preventable.

Source: nps.org.au
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 08/08/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Herbal and Dietary Supplement–Drug Interactions in Patients with Chronic Illnesses

This review focuses on the use of dietary supplements in patients with chronic conditions, in whom the risk for dietary supplement–drug interaction is the greatest.

Source: aafp.org
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 08/05/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Are there any complementary and alternative medicines that should be avoided in patients on cancer chemotherapy?
Prepared by UK Medicines Information (UKMi) pharmacists for NHS healthcare professionals

This Q&A focuses on CAMs with pharmacological activity such as herbal medicines, vitamins and minerals. It summarises information from current literature regarding the common characteristics of CAMs that clinicians need to consider when using together with cancer chemotherapy and includes recommendations on commonly used CAMs.

Source: sps.nhs.uk
Clinical Resource: Medicines Question and Answer
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Last Checked: 22/09/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Herbs for mental illness: Effectiveness and interaction with conventional medicines

The herbal remedies discussed in this article are those commonly used for psychiatric conditions. Their effectiveness and potential for adverse side effects and interactions are assessed.

Source: jfponline.com
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

St John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum): drug interactions and clinical outcomes

The aim of this work is to identify the medicines which interact with the herbal remedy St John’s wort (SJW), and the mechanisms responsible.

Source: eu.wiley.com
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Herb-medicine interactions: St John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum)
Useful information for pharmacists

This information sheet identifies the principal interacting medicines and explains the basis of the interactions. It may be used, together with other information sources, as a basis to provide advice to patients.

Source: nes.scot.nhs.uk
Clinical Resource: Information Sheet
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Goldenseal Drug Interactions

Goldenseal is a popular herbal product containing the alkaloids berberine and hydrastine. It is used to treat infections of various types, inflammation, hypertension, and many other disorders. Evidence is accumulating that goldenseal may have some clinically important drug interactions.

Source: hanstenandhorn.com
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 05/06/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Can patients on levothyroxine take sea kelp?
Prepared by UK Medicines Information (UKMi) pharmacists for NHS healthcare professionals

Kelp is a generic term that refers to Laminaria and Macrocystis species of brown seaweeds, although in practice the term is often used in reference to species of Fucus. The species Fucus vesiculosus, more commonly known as bladderwrack, is reported to be commonly used in the preparation of kelp products. Because of its iodine content kelp has traditionally been used as a source of iodine for thyroid deficiency and as a slimming supplement.

Source: sps.nhs.uk
Clinical Resource: Medicines Question and Answer
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Last Checked: 22/09/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Drug Interactions with Vitamins and Minerals

In this article, common drug interactions with vitamins and minerals are discussed, along with suggestions on how the pharmacist should manage these interactions.

Source: uspharmacist.com
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency
Herbal medicines regulations

This section of the site is aimed at anyone wishing to place herbal medicines on the UK market and outlines the different regulatory requirements.

Source: webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk
Clinical Resource: Safety Information
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Last Checked: 23/04/15 Link Error: Report It

 

How Safe are Herbal Products?

The inherent toxic properties of herbal ingredients may be the cause of adverse effects arising from the ingestion or topical application of herbal products.

Source: mcppnet.org
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Quackwatch

Quackwatch is an international network of people who are concerned about health-related frauds, myths, fads, fallacies, and misconduct. Its primary focus is on quackery-related information that is difficult or impossible to get elsewhere. Founded by Dr. Stephen Barrett in 1969 as the Lehigh Valley Committee Against Health Fraud (Allentown, Pennsylvania), it was incorporated in 1970. In 1997, it assumed its current name and began developing a worldwide network of volunteers and expert advisors. Our activities include:

  • Investigating questionable claims
  • Answering inquiries about products and services
  • Advising quackery victims
  • Distributing reliable publications
  • Debunking pseudoscientific claims
  • Reporting illegal marketing
  • Assisting or generating consumer-protection lawsuits
  • Improving the quality of health information on the Internet
  • Attacking misleading advertising on the Internet
  • Consumer Health Digest, a free weekly e-mail newsletter
  • The healthfraud discussion list, which has about 600 members
Source: quackwatch.com
Clinical Resource: Various
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

LiverTox

LIVERTOX is a freely available website that provides up-to-date, comprehensive and unbiased information about drug induced liver injury caused by prescription and nonprescription drugs, herbals and dietary supplements.

LiverTox is a joint effort of the Liver Disease Research Branch of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and the Division of Specialized Information Services of the National Library of Medicine (NLM), National Institutes of Health.

Source: nih.gov
Clinical Resource: Database
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Last Checked: 17/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Herbal medicines and anaesthesia

The aim of this article was to discuss the more commonly used herbal medicines, their side-effects and their effects on the conduct of anaesthesia. These include echinacea, ephedra, garlic, ginger, gingko biloba, ginseng, herbal diuretics, kava, St John’s Wort, and valerian.

Source: oxfordjournals.org
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists Medical Guidelines for the Clinical Use of Dietary Supplements and Nutraceuticals

Source: aace.com
Clinical Resource: Guideline
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

The Cochrane Collaboration
Cochrane Reviews - Complementary & Alternative Medicine

Cochrane is an international, non-profit, independent organisation, established to ensure that up-to-date, accurate information about the effects of healthcare interventions is readily available worldwide. It produces and disseminates systematic reviews of healthcare interventions, and promotes the search for evidence in the form of clinical trials and other studies of the effects of interventions.

Source: cochrane.org
Clinical Resource: Systematic Reviews
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Last Checked: 13/07/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Bandolier Knowledge
Complementary and Alternative Therapies

This site is intended to gather the best evidence available about complementary and alternative therapies (CAT) for sufferers and professionals.

Source: bandolier.org.uk
Clinical Resource: Evidence Based Abstracts
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Last Checked: 13/06/17 Link Error: Report It

 

National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Resources for Health Care Providers

The evidence-based resources on this page, such as research results and clinical practice guidelines, will help prepare you to discuss CAM approaches with your patients

Source: nccam.nih.gov
Clinical Resource: Various
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Longwood Herbal Task Force

The LHTF was organized in the fall of 1998 by faculty, staff and students from Children’s Hospital, the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences and the Dana Farber Cancer Institute to learn more about and teach other clinicians about herbs and dietary supplements.

Source: longwoodherbal.org
Clinical Resource: Monographs
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Last Checked: 19/06/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Natural Herbs, Herbal Remedies, Medicine and Supplements

NaturalHerbsGuide.com is a non-commercial, evidence-based, natural herbs and herbal remedies information site who's sole purpose is to help consumers learn more about helpful natural herbs, herbal remedies, and herbal medicines.

Source: naturalherbsguide.com
Clinical Resource: Various
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Last Checked: 19/06/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Vitamins, Herbs, and Dietary Supplements

Find evidence-based information on individual ingredients such as herbs, vitamins, minerals, and other dietary supplements. The supplement monographs on RxList include a description, review of effectiveness, how it works, safety concerns, and interactions with medications.

Source: rxlist.com
Clinical Resource: Monographs
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Complementary and Alternative Medicine Guide

Source: umm.edu
Clinical Resource: Database
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
About Herbs, Botanicals & Other Products

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center’s About Herbs database, a tool for the public as well as healthcare professionals, can help you figure out the value of using common herbs and other dietary supplements.

Source: mskcc.org
Clinical Resource: Database
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Last Checked: 19/10/15 Link Error: Report It

 

The Merck Manual for Health Care Professionals
Dietary Supplements

Topics in Dietary Supplements

Black Cohosh · Chamomile· Chondroitin Sulfate · Chromium · Coenzyme Q10 · Cranberry · Creatine · Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) · Echinacea · Feverfew · Fish Oil · Garlic · Ginger · Ginkgo · Ginseng · Glucosamine · Goldenseal · Green Tea · Kava · Licorice · Melatonin · Milk Thistle · S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine · Saw Palmetto · St. John's Wort · Valerian · Zinc

Source: merckmanuals.com
Clinical Resource: Manual
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Health Supplements Information Service
A-Z of supplements

The following factsheets include information such as the foods the nutrient can be found in, what it does, recommended intake, deficiency symptoms, who might benefit from taking it and if there are any side effects/precautions.

Source: hsis.org
Clinical Resource: Factsheets
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Top 20 Herbs

HerbMed® - an interactive, electronic herbal database - provides hyperlinked access to the scientific data underlying the use of herbs for health. It is an impartial, evidence-based information resource provided by the nonprofit Alternative Medicine Foundation, Inc. This public site provides access to the 20 most popular herbs.

Source: herbmed.org
Clinical Resource: Database
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Urban Herbs: Medicinal Plants

Urban Herbs is a project of the Department of Pharmacology & Physiology, Georgetown University School of Medicine.

Monographs Available:

Aconite, Amaranth, Anise hyssop, Autumn Crocus, Basil, Balloonflower, Bee Balm, Bishop's Flower, Blackberry Lily, Blanketflower, Burdock, ButterflyWeed, Canada Thistle, Calendula, Catnip, Chaste Tree, Chicory, Chives, Comfrey, Curled Dock, Dandelion, English Plantain, Evening Primrose, Feverfew, Foxglove, German Chamomile, Ginkgo, Ground Ivy, Honey Herb, Horny Goat Weed,Horse Nettle, Japanese Knotweed, Jimsonweed, Lavender, Lemon balm, Lemon mint, Lamb's Quarters, Maximillian sunflower, Mexican Hat, Moss Verbena, Mugwort, Mullein, Oregano, Passionflower, Peppermint, Plains Coreopsis, Pokeweed, Purple Coneflower, Purslane, Red Clover, Roman Chanomile, Rosemary, Sage, Scarlet flax, Seabuckthorn, Sedum, Stevia, Thyme, White Clover, Wintergreen, Woad, Yarrow, Yellow Sweet Clover, Yellow Wood Sorrel

Source: georgetown.edu
Clinical Resource: Monographs
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Last Checked: 21/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Natural Choices: A Guide to Herbal and Non-herbal Medicines

With the expanding use of herbal medicines and non-herbal dietary supplements, physicians will increasingly see patients who self-prescribe these agents, often without disclosing their use. Many patients, assuming that complementary medicines are naturally safe, combine complementary and conventional therapies, perceiving the combination to be more effective. This raises concerns about the appropriate therapeutic use, contraindications, adverse effects and drug interactions of herbal and non-herbal drugs, especially in patients with acute or chronic illness.

Source: stacommunications.com
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Herbal Medicine

There have been multiple cases of toxicity in recent years, prompting more National Institute of Health (NIH) funding for appropriate investigations of the possible efficacy or harm of these supplements. The FDA plans to have a scientifically based programestablished by the year 2010 to regulate the safety and labeling of these types of products. Currently,most data on use and toxicity of herbal supplements comes from surveys and anecdotal case reportand much knowledge is obviously lacking. For this reason, risk-benefit assessments of herbal supplements are not completely reliable. The following is a brief overview of some of the most commonly used herbal supplements and their potential toxicities.

Source: mnpoison.org
Clinical Resource: Article
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Kava

Kava, also known as kawa, ava, or awa is an herb derived from the roots of the plant Piper methysticum or “intoxicating pepper.” A member of the pepper family, this plant is a large shrub that is cultivated in many Pacific Islands.

Source: utah.edu
Clinical Resource: Poison Control Centre Newsletter
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Last Checked: 21/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Evidence Based Review of Fish Oil: Going Beyond the Headlines

This review will summarize the evidence reviewed and conclusions drawn from the high quality metaanalyses and systematic reviews evaluating the therapeutic effects of fish oil supplementation on the previous identified outcomes.

Source: oregonstate.edu
Clinical Resource: Newsletter
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Last Checked: 23/10/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Complementary Corner: Echinacea – not to be sneezed at

Many herbal medicines contain pharmacologically active ingredients that have the potential to cause adverse reactions or interact with conventional medicines. One such herbal substance is echinacea.

Source: medsafe.govt.nz
Clinical Resource: Prescriber Update Article
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Complementary Corner: St John’s Wort and Serotonin Syndrome

A single cup of Healtheries “Be Happy” tea and two days of citalopram treatment has been associated with a case of serotonin syndrome resulting in hospitalisation.

Source: medsafe.govt.nz
Clinical Resource: Prescriber Update Article
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Glucosamine in osteoarthritis: Update of the evidence

The rationale for the use of glucosamine in osteoarthritis (OA) is that it is a precursor for glycosaminoglycans and glycoproteins, which are a major constituent of joint cartilage and synovial fluid.

Source: auspharmlist.net.au
Clinical Resource: Pharmacy E-Bulletin
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Leicestershire Medicines Strategy Group Guideline
Glucosamine “black” for Osteoarthritis

Source: lmsg.nhs.uk
Clinical Resource: Guideline
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Last Checked: 19/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Glucosamine for osteoarthritis of the knee

Glucosamine is a normal constituent of the proteoglycans found in joint cartilage and synovial fluid. It has been recommended for many years by practitioners of complementary medicine for the treatment of osteoarthritis. Clinical trials have now shown that the use of oral glucosamine sulphate 1.5 g daily in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee results in a significant reduction in joint pain and an improvement in joint function.

Source: nps.org.au
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 08/08/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Can patients with renal impairment take glucosamine?
Prepared by UK Medicines Information (UKMi) pharmacists for NHS healthcare professionals

Glucosamine is available in a variety of over-the-counter dietary supplements and as licensed prescription only medicines, therefore quality and content varies between products. Little information is available about herbs and dietary supplements in patients with renal impairment.

Source: sps.nhs.uk
Clinical Resource: Medicines Question and Answer
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Last Checked: 22/09/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Complementary and alternative medicines for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and fibromyalgia

This document, written and produced by Arthritis Research UK, is an evidence-based report on the use of complementary and alternative medicines for arthritis and musculoskeletal conditions. It uses data from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) – the type of studies that give the best evidence on whether a treatment is effective or not – and aims to help people with these conditions select which complementary medicines may be useful for them.

Practitioner-based complementary and alternative therapies for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia and low back pain

Our first review, Complementary and alternative medicines for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and fibromyalgia, focused on products that are taken orally or applied to the skin. This second report considers practitioner-based therapies such as acupuncture, chiropractic, osteopathy and hypnotherapy, and other therapies such as magnet therapy and copper bracelets. The purpose is to provide a resource for patients and healthcare professionals by summarising current evidence on the effectiveness and safety of commonly used complementary or alternative therapies available within the UK.

Source: arthritisresearchuk.org
Clinical Resource: Reports
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Last Checked: 28/04/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Complementary Medications in Psychiatry

This bulletin looks at some of the complementary medicines used in psychiatry and the evidence supporting their use.

Source: watag.org.au
Clinical Resource: Bulletin
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Herbal remedies for depression and anxiety

In this article, I will review the evidence for or against herbal remedies as treatments for depression and anxiety.

Source: apt.rcpsych.org
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists Scientific Impact Paper on Alternatives to HRT for Management of Symptoms of the Menopause

Source: rcog.org.uk
Clinical Resource: Scientific Impact Paper
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Last Checked: 19/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Complementary and Herbal Therapies for Hot Flushes

There have been a great many trials of complementary and herbal medicines and some of these have suggested benefits from certain therapies and others have shown no benefit. It can be difficult for consumers and for doctors to interpret this mixed information. This information sheet provides a brief overview of the current evidence for complementary and herbal therapies.

Source: menopause.org.au
Clinical Resource: Information Sheet
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Last Checked: 29/11/16 Link Error: Report It

 

The role of soy isoflavones in menopausal health: report of The North American Menopause Society/Wulf H

If and to what extent soy protein, soy isoflavones, and their metabolites, including S(Y)-equol, have beneficial effects on women's health is currently unclear. The North American Menopause Society (NAMS)/Utian Translational Science Symposium on Soy and Soy Isoflavones convened October 9-10, 2010, to clarify basic and clinical research findings as they relate to the risk and benefits of soy products for peri- and postmenopausal women.

Source: menopause.org
Clinical Resource: Report
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Last Checked: 21/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

The role of calcium in peri- and postmenopausal women: 2006 position statement of The North American Menopause Society

Source: menopause.org
Clinical Resource: Position Statement
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Last Checked: 21/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Herbs, Vitamins and Minerals in the Treatment of Premenstrual Syndrome: A Systematic Review

As many women experiencing symptoms of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) seek relief from natural products (NP), health care providers should have quality information available to aid women in making evidence-based decisions regarding use of these products.

Source: jptcp.com
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Herbs and herbal teas: Safety during pregnancy or while breastfeeding

Whether you use herbs to prevent or treat a health problem or drink herbal teas to replace caffeinated drinks, read on to find out how to make a safe choice.

Source: york.ca
Clinical Resource: Informational Material
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Herbal and Traditional Medicines in Pregnancy

This fact sheet is for women who are concerned about the use of herbal and traditional medicines while pregnant.

Source: thewomens.org.au
Clinical Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Herbal and Traditional Medicines in Breastfeeding

This fact sheet is for women who are concerned about the use of herbal and traditional medicines while breastfeeding.

Source: thewomens.org.au
Clinical Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Q: What is the role of fenugreek for enhancing milk production in breastfeeding women?

A: Fenugreek is a natural supplement and a member of the Fabaceae/Leguminosae family. It has been used to treat various conditions including diabetes, decreased appetite, dyspepsia, gastro-esophageal reflux disease(GERD), and hyperlipidemia. It has historically been employed to stimulate milk production in women who are breast feeding.

Source: duq.edu
Clinical Resource: Pharmaceutical Information Centre Publication
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Asthma & Complementary Therapies
An information paper for health professionals

This information paper provides an evidence-based summary of the effectiveness of various complementary therapies used by people with asthma.

Reference List

Source: nationalasthma.org.au
Clinical Resource: Information Paper and Reference
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Last Checked: 15/05/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Irritable bowel syndrome
The role of complementary medicines in treatment

This article discusses the use of complementary medicines in the treatment of IBS.

Source: racgp.org.au
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Herbal Therapies for Pain

A scientific review of efficacy and adverse effects.

Source: painedu.org
Clinical Resource: Tool
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Evidence-based Basics on Nutraceuticals: Herbs, Minerals, Vitamins, and Supplements in Migraine Management

Is there a place for nutraceuticals in the management of migraine? This document reviews the randomized, controlled trials (RCT) for migraine for various minerals, herbs, vitamins and supplements, and gives therapeutic recommendations for the interested clinician.

Source: americanheadachesociety.org
Clinical Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Evidence-based guideline update: NSAIDs and other complementary treatments for episodic migraine prevention in adults

Report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the American Headache Society

Source: aan.com
Clinical Resource: Guideline
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Complementary medicines in pre-dialysis patients
The CARI Guidelines – Caring for Australians with Renal Impairment

This guideline aims to assess whether improved or reduced renal survival is associated with the use of complementary medicines.

Source: cari.org.au
Clinical Resource: Archived Guideline
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Supplements for Prostate Health

This article will discuss some common nonprescription therapies that are used for prostate health.

Source: uspharmacist.com
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Cranberry Juice and Urinary Tract Infection

Cranberries have long been the focus of interest for their beneficial effects in preventing urinary tract infections (UTIs). Cranberries contain 2 compounds with antiadherence properties that prevent fimbriated Escherichia coli from adhering to uroepithelial cells in the urinary tract.

Source: cdi.oxfordjournals.org
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Homoeopathy and vaccination

Some people consider homoeopathy (also spelt ‘homeopathy’) for their child’s immunisation rather than conventional immunisation. However, unlike conventional vaccinations, there has been no rigorously tested research to demonstrate the safety or effectiveness of homoeopathic preparations, or other CAM therapies, to provide protection against childhood infectious diseases.

Source: ncirs.edu.au
Clinical Resource: Factsheet
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Last Checked: 19/10/15 Link Error: Report It

 

American Academy of Ophthalmology Complementary Therapy Assessments

Source: aao.org
Clinical Resource: Complementary Therapy Assessments
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Ocular side effects
Supplements and herbal remedies are reflected in the eye

Over 16 supplements and herbal medications have been recognized to affect the eye.

Source: parkhurstexchange.com
Clinical Resource: Checklist
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Ocular Nutrition A to Z

Click on the left hand links and get connected to the latest nutrition articles appearing in Review of Optometry, archived articles from Review’s year-long ocular nutrition series, the latest research studies and other articles related to vitamins and nutrition authored by leading optometrists.

Source: ocularnutritionatoz.com
Clinical Resource: Various
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Diagnostic & Treatment Algorithms for Retinal Health & Function
Nutrition

As the final installment of this algorithms series, this monograph breaks from the previous running topic of ocular surface disease states and focuses on ocular nutrition, with a specific look at how diet and nutritional supplementation can improve visual function, particularly in the intervention of AMD.

Source: revoptom.com
Clinical Resource: Monograph
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Leicestershire Medicines Strategy Group Guideline
Dietary Supplements for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Source: lmsg.nhs.uk
Clinical Resource: Guideline
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Last Checked: 11/04/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Office of Dietary Supplements

The mission of ODS is to strengthen knowledge and understanding of dietary supplements by evaluating scientific information, stimulating and supporting research, disseminating research results, and educating the public to foster an enhanced quality of life and health for the U.S. population.

Reliable information about the use, effectiveness, safety, and quality of dietary supplements. Includes fact sheets for health professionals and consumers, answers to common questions, and tips to help you choose and use dietary supplements.

Source: nih.gov
Clinical Resource: Various
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Towards a Healthier Britain 2010

This report, commissioned by PAGB and authored by Dr Pamela Mason and Dr Carrie Ruxton, provides an analysis of the nation’s nutritional intake. It is an update of 2008's Towards a Healthier Britain report using the latest scientific evidence from dietary surveys.

The report finds that nutrient intakes have improved very little in the past decade and a substantial number of British adults and children are at risk of nutrient deficiency. It goes on to explore the role of supplementation and suggests ways to improve how nutritional advice is presented to the public.

Source: pagb.co.uk
Clinical Resource: Report
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Who Needs Vitamins??

In the past few years, much attention has been placed upon the intake of certain vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, phytochemicals, etc. and the role they may play in the prevention of chronic disease.

Source: usask.ca
Clinical Resource: Drug Information Services Newsletter
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

The Merck Manual for Health Care Professionals
Vitamin Deficiency, Dependency, and Toxicity

Topics in Vitamin Deficiency, Dependency and Toxicity

Biotin and Pantothenic Acid · Folate · Niacin · Riboflavin · Thiamin · Vitamin A · Vitamin B6· Vitamin B12 · Vitamin C · Vitamin D · Vitamin E · Vitamin K

Source: merckmanuals.com
Clinical Resource: Manual
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Vitamins and minerals: dietary sources, supplements and deficiencies

The following article focuses on the necessity for use of four common vitamins and minerals.

Source: bpac.org.nz
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Potion or Poison? Vitamin C

For most people, a healthy diet will provide an adequate dose of vitamin C. Use of vitamin C may reduce the duration of symptoms but not the incidence of the common cold. High doses (>2 g/day) can have adverse effects and may interact with warfarin and aluminium. Vitamin C should be used cautiously with oestrogens, cancer chemotherapy, HIV medications, statins and fluphenazine.

Source: rnzcgp.org.nz
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 12/06/17 Link Error: Report It

 

Nutriceuticals: Over-the-Counter Products and Osteoporosis

Upon completion of this activity, the participant should be able to:

  • Describe the impact of dietary calcium and vitamin D on bone health.
  • Teach patients how to calculate the amount of calcium in their diets.
  • List the nutriceuticals that may have potential, but unproven, benefit to bone.
  • Explain the effect of dietary phosphorus on bone (both excess and deficient).
  • Elicit information on nutriceutical use from patients and advise them regarding effectiveness.
Source: nof.org
Clinical Resource: Publication
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The role of calcium and vitamin D in the management of osteoporosis

The role of calcium and vitamin D supplementation in the treatment of osteoporosis has been extensively studied. The aim of this paper was to reach, where possible, consensus views on five key questions relating to calcium and vitamin D supplementation in the management of osteoporosis.

Source: esceo.org
Clinical Resource: Paper
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Last Checked: 20/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

British Nutrition Foundation Briefing Paper on Selenium and Health

This Briefing Paper provides detailed information on the sources of selenium in the UK diet. This is followed by a description of the recent trends in selenium intake in the UK, in the context of existing recommendations for minimum and maximum intake. Current knowledge about the metabolic regulation and function of selenium in the body is outlined, together with the methods available for the assessment of selenium status. Finally, symptoms of selenium deficiency are described and the evidence for links between less overt deficiency and diseases such as cancer and heart diseases reviewed.

Source: nutrition.org.uk
Clinical Resource: Briefing Paper
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

The essentials of diet and supplements for improving cardiovascular health

Approximately two-thirds of adults are now overweight or obese. The lifetime incidence of hypertension is 90%, diabetes or prediabetes affects one in three people, and CV disease kills almost half of us. Physicians have an ever-expanding array of prescription drugs to treat these problems, but relying exclusively on pharmacologic therapies, which are often expensive and occasionally toxic, to treat epidemics caused by a maladaptive diet is less rational than simply realigning our eating habits to conform to the natural diet on which we are genetically programmed to thrive.

Source: pccj.eu
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Supplementation of Vitamins E and C for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

Antioxidants such as ascorbic acid, betacarotene and vitamin E have been studied in numerous clinical trials to prove that supplementation reduces risk of cardiovascular events.

Source: belmont.edu
Clinical Resource: Drug Information Centre Newsletter
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Antiplatelet effects of Fish Oil supplements

Two of the most important omega-3 fatty acids in fish oil are eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).

Source: auspharmlist.net.au
Clinical Resource: Pharmacy E-Bulletin
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Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists Scientific Impact Paper on Periconceptional Folic Acid and Food Fortification in the Prevention of Neural Tube Defects

Source: rcog.org
Clinical Resource: Scientific Impact Paper
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Last Checked: 19/08/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Omega-3s in Pregnancy

Currently, researchers are investigating the ability of omega-3s, when supplemented in pregnancy, to decrease allergies in infants, increase length of gestation, decrease risk of preterm labor, enhance cognitive development, and prevent and treat perinatal depression. Because omega-3 fatty acids are necessary for neuronal and visual development and may have other benefits, guidelines recommend at least 200 mg of DHA per day for pregnant women.

Source: uwyo.edu
Clinical Resource: Newsletter
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Aromatherapy: Art or Science? Highlights of Aromatherapy in Medicine Today

Learning Objectives

  1. Discuss the history of aromatherapy and the theory of application.
  2. Outline the process of producing, categorizing, purchasing, and administering essential oils for aromatherapy.
  3. Identify the potential areas of controversy and adverse effects associated with aromatherapy.
  4. Describe the current literature for the use of lavender, rosemary, neroli, and other aromatherapy agents for therapy in cognition, dementia, cancer, dermatologic conditions, and pain.
Source: inetce.com
Clinical Resource: CE / CPD / Learning
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Complementary Corner: Essential oils associated with seizures

Essential oils, obtained from plants, are widely used in aromatherapy and are included in some medicines. Healthcare professionals are reminded that these substances, when administered orally or topically, can rarely cause seizures in young children and in those patients with epilepsy.

Source: medsafe.govt.nz
Clinical Resource: Prescriber Update Article
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Last Checked: 24/02/14 Link Error: Report It

 

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