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Food Allergies & Food Intolerance

Welcome to the food allergies and food intolerance category which includes links for physicians and pharmacists on clinical guidelines such as coeliac / celiac disease, prescribing lactose-free and gluten-free medicines and more.

Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Food Allergy in the United States: Report of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases-Sponsored Expert Panel

Food allergy is a public health problem that affects children and adults and may be increasing in prevalence. Currently, there is no treatment for food allergy; the disease can only be managed by allergen avoidance or treatment of symptoms. The diagnosis of food allergy also may be difficult because non-allergic food reactions, such as food intolerance, are often mistakenly classified as food allergies.

To address these concerns, NIAID worked with 34 professional organizations, federal agencies, and patient advocacy groups to develop concise clinical guidelines for healthcare professionals on the diagnosis and management of food allergy and the treatment of acute food allergy reactions.

Source: nih.gov
Clinical Resource: Guideline
Register to Access Content: No

Last Checked: 28/04/14 Link Error: Report It

 

ICON: Food allergy

The International Collaboration in Asthma and Allergy initiated an international coalition among the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology; World Allergy Organization; and American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology on food allergy.

Source: eaaci.org
Clinical Resource: Position Paper
Register to Access Content: No

Last Checked: 28/04/14 Link Error: Report It

 

British Nutrition Foundation Briefing Paper on Food Allergy and Intolerance

There is considerable confusion about the terminology used to describe various types of adverse reactions to food. This Briefing Paper aims to describe the terminology used by experts in the field, give an overview of the different types of diagnostic tests available and the prevalence of various types of adverse reactions, and to describe the main types of food allergy and intolerance that exist.

Source: nutrition.org.uk
Clinical Resource: Briefing Paper
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Last Checked: 15/02/13 Link Error: Report It

 

Food allergy: A practice parameter update - 2014

This parameter was developed by the Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters, representing the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

Source: aaaai.org
Clinical Resource: Practice Parameter
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Last Checked: 08/05/15 Link Error: Report It

 

 

Standardization of food challenges in patients with immediate reactions to foods – position paper from the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology

Source: eaaci.org
Clinical Resource: Position Paper
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Last Checked: 28/04/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Food Allergies

Adverse reactions to food that are not immune mediated are not considered to be food allergies. An example is lactose intolerance, which is caused by a deficiency of lactase. Adverse reactions to foods can also occur from toxic (eg, bacterial food poisoning) or pharmacologic (eg, caffeine) effects.

Source: medscape.com
Clinical Resource: Article
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Last Checked: 28/04/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Food Allergy

Adverse reactions can be subdivided into non-toxic or toxic reactions. The term food allergy is used when an immunological mechanism has been defined or is suspected. The two broad groups of immune reactions are IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated.

Source: worldallergy.org
Clinical Resource: Disease Summary
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Last Checked: 28/04/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Food Allergy Research & Education
Resources for Health Providers

FARE is here to help you help your patients. Physicians, nurses, dietitians, nutritionists, researchers and other health professionals will find FARE’s many materials on food allergy management helpful. We also can help connect you with more information about clinical trials occurring in your area should you have patients who are interested in participating.

Source: foodallergy.org
Clinical Resource: Various
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Last Checked: 28/04/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Welcome to the Food Standards Agency's food allergy online training.

This interactive training has been developed by the Food Standards Agency primarily for local authority enforcement officers, but it might also be of interest to anyone wanting to learn more about food allergy.

Source: allergytraining.food.gov.uk
Clinical Resource: CE / CPD / Learning
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Last Checked: 28/04/14 Link Error: Report It

 

 

Eczematous reactions to food in atopic eczema: position paper of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and Global Allergy and Asthma European Network

Source: eaaci.org
Clinical Resource: Position Paper
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Last Checked: 28/04/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Implication of Food Allergies and Intolerances on Medication Administration

This article will provide readers with a brief overview of food allergies, illustrate specific examples of medication-food allergy precautions relevant to the orthopedist, and suggest approaches to medication administration in patients with food allergies.

Source: healio.com
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 28/04/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Lactose Intolerance

Lactose Intolerance is the clinical syndrome that occurs, when the inability to digest lactose results in gastrointestinal symptoms.

Source: bpac.org.nz
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 28/04/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Lactose Intolerance

Lactose, a natural sugar found in milk and products made from milk, is digested in the body by an enzyme known as lactase. If a person does not produce sufficient amounts of lactase, lactose can be difficult to digest. In some people, this problem results in a condition known as lactose intolerance.

Source: uspharmacist.com
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 28/04/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Lactose Intolerance: Considerations for the Clinician

The intent of this article is to provide practical guidelines for working with patients who are lactose intolerant and to answer some common questions that may arise.

Source: virginia.edu
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 25/04/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Lactose: The Hidden Culprit in Medication Intolerance?

Clinicians of all specialties should understand the impact of lactose intolerance, particularly as the substance may be the cause of a variety of medication intolerance reactions. This article provides an overview of the condition, as well as implications in the practice of orthopedic surgery. A particular focus is given to orthopedic medication selection and prescribing based on lactose content of specific drug products.

Source: healio.com
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 28/04/14 Link Error: Report It

 

What factors need to be considered when prescribing for lactose intolerant adults?
Prepared by UK Medicines Information (UKMi) pharmacists for NHS healthcare professionals

Lactose is widely used in pharmaceutical formulations as a diluent or filler in tablets or capsules. This includes prescription medicines, over-the-counter and complementary medicines.

Source: sps.nhs.uk
Clinical Resource: Medicines Question and Answer
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Last Checked: 22/09/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Is there a lactose-free hormone replacement therapy (HRT)?
Prepared by UK Medicines Information (UKMi) pharmacists for NHS healthcare professionals

All branded oral formulations of oestrogen-containing hormone replacement therapy (HRT) currently available on prescription contain lactose.

Source: sps.nhs.uk
Clinical Resource: Medicines Question and Answer
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Last Checked: 22/09/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Is there a lactose-free oral contraceptive?
Prepared by UK Medicines Information (UKMi) pharmacists for NHS healthcare professionals

All licensed oral contraceptives currently available on prescription contain lactose.

Source: sps.nhs.uk
Clinical Resource: Medicines Question and Answer
Register to Access Content: No

Last Checked: 22/09/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Which antidepressants are available in lactose-free formulations?
Prepared by UK Medicines Information (UKMi) pharmacists for NHS healthcare professionals

Lactose is widely used in pharmaceutical formulations as a diluent or carrier. The dose of lactose in most pharmaceuticals is usually less than 2g per day and is unlikely to cause symptoms except in cases of severe lactose intolerance.

Source: sps.nhs.uk
Clinical Resource: Medicines Question and Answer
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Last Checked: 22/09/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Is there a lactose-free lipid regulating medicine?
Prepared by UK Medicines Information (UKMi) pharmacists for NHS healthcare professionals

The following table lists which lipid regulating medicines do not contain lactose, i.e. are defined as lactose-free.

Source: sps.nhs.uk
Clinical Resource: Medicines Question and Answer
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Last Checked: 22/09/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Which oral antihistamines are available in lactose-free formulations?
Prepared by UK Medicines Information (UKMi) pharmacists for NHS healthcare professionals

The table below gives details of lactose free formulations of oral antihistamine

Source: sps.nhs.uk
Clinical Resource: Medicines Question and Answer
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Last Checked: 22/09/16 Link Error: Report It

 

British Society of Gastroenterology Guidance on Coeliac Disease

Source: bsg.org.uk
Clinical Resource: Guidance
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Last Checked: 28/04/14 Link Error: Report It

 

National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Guidance > Coeliac disease: Recognition and assessment of coeliac disease

Source: nice.org.uk
Clinical Resource: Guidance
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Last Checked: 18/05/15 Link Error: Report It

 

World Gastroenterology Organisation Practice Guideline - Celiac Disease

Source: worldgastroenterology.org
Clinical Resource: Guideline
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Last Checked: 19/10/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Healthcare Professionals - Coeliac UK

Healthcare Professionals

Diagnosis
Management
Resources
Healthcare professionals FAQs

Source: coeliac.org.uk
Clinical Resource: Various
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Last Checked: 28/04/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Celiac Disease: What Gluten-Free Means Today

The only treatment for celiac disease is a gluten-free diet. This diet is free of all but very small amounts of gluten. In 2007 the Food and Drug Administration released a proposed rule for the labeling of gluten-free food.

Source: virginia.edu
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 25/04/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Medications and Celiac Disease - Tips From a Pharmacist

Patients who have been diagnosed with celiac disease or have a need to follow a gluten-free diet must be aware of potential sources of gluten. In the area of pharmaceuticals, potential sources of gluten contamination come primarily from the addition of the excipient ingredients added to the active drug in order to make a particular dosage form.

Source: virginia.edu
Clinical Resource: Journal Article
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Last Checked: 25/04/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Gluten and oral prescription medicines

People with coeliac disease should avoid products containing gluten. While oats (uncontaminated) do not contain gluten, they do contain avenin, which is a prolamine. Avenin is toxic to the intestinal mucosa of avenin-sensitive individuals, and can trigger a reaction in these coeliacs. The question is often raised as to the content and significance of gluten in oral prescription medicines.

Source: auspharmlist.net.au
Clinical Resource: Pharmacy E-Bulletin
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Last Checked: 28/04/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Gluten Free Drugs

A source of information for gluten free drugs

Source: glutenfreedrugs.com
Clinical Resource: Various
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Last Checked: 28/04/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Beware – Peanut Oil is Present in Some Medicines!

Healthcare professionals are advised to consider the potential for allergic reactions to occur when prescribing or dispensing medicines to patients with a known peanut allergy.

Source: medsafe.govt.nz
Clinical Resource: Prescriber Update Article
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Last Checked: 28/04/14 Link Error: Report It

 

Arachis oil in medicines-what are the risks of developing peanut allergy?
Prepared by UK Medicines Information (UKMi) pharmacists for NHS healthcare professionals

Concerns have been raised that exposure to arachis oil in infancy can lead to an increased risk of developing peanut allergy. This Q&A also covers its administration to individuals with confirmed peanut allergy.

Source: sps.nhs.uk
Clinical Resource: Medicines Question and Answer
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Last Checked: 22/09/16 Link Error: Report It

 

Is there a suitable vitamin D product for a patient with a peanut or soya allergy?
Prepared by UK Medicines Information (UKMi) pharmacists for NHS healthcare professionals

A document has been written which lists the available products for treating vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency, including cost, licensing status, and risk category.

Source: sps.nhs.uk
Clinical Resource: Medicines Question and Answer
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Last Checked: 22/09/16 Link Error: Report It

 

British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology guidelines for the management of egg allergy

Source: bsaci.org
Clinical Resource: Guideline
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Last Checked: 08/05/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Immunizations for Child With Egg Allergy

Would it be safe to administer measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine to this child? His mother does not want to consider single-dose vaccines, which are egg-free. Would it be advisable to delay his MMR until a later stage?

Source: medscape.com
Clinical Resource: Question and Response
Register to Access Content: Yes - registration is FREE

Last Checked: 22/04/14 Link Error: Report It

 

British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology Recommendations for Combined Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) Vaccination in Egg-Allergic children

Source: bsaci.org
Clinical Resource: Position Statement
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Last Checked: 08/05/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Administering influenza vaccine to egg allergic recipients: a focused practice parameter update

These parameters were developed by the Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters, representing the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI), the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

Source: allergyparameters.org
Clinical Resource: Practice Parameter
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Last Checked: 08/05/15 Link Error: Report It

 

Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy Guidelines for medical practitioners - Influenza vaccination of the egg allergic individual

Source: allergy.org.au
Clinical Resource: Guideline
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Last Checked: 22/04/14 Link Error: Report It

 

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